In Roman numerals dates converter (birth, wedding) year, month, day

Convert calendar dates into Roman numerals

Learn how to convert any calendar date (birthday, wedding, anniversary, celebration, today) to Roman numerals. Convert each date component separately, month (1 - 12), day (1 - 31) and year, as bare numbers:

1: Break the number (decompose it) into place value subgroups;

2: Convert each subgroup;

3: Wrap up the Roman numeral.

Latest calendar dates converted to Roman numerals

Feb-12, 10 = II - XII - XJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Feb-07, 2 = II - VII - IIJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Dec-18, 15 = XII - XVIII - XVJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Dec-19, 2017 = XII - XIX - MMXVIIJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Dec-09, 37 = XII - IX - XXXVIIJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Dec-08, 1912 = XII - VIII - MCMXIIJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Jan-03, 1951 = I - III - MCMLIJan 21 22:38 UTC (GMT)
Aug-14, 26 = VIII - XIV - XXVIJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
Jun-22, 2016 = VI - XXII - MMXVIJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
May-11, 56 = V - XI - LVIJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
Jan-07, 89 = I - VII - LXXXIXJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
Oct-07, 2003 = X - VII - MMIIIJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
Jan-08, 87 = I - VIII - LXXXVIIJan 21 22:37 UTC (GMT)
converted dates, see more...

The set of Roman numerals used for writing calendar dates

  • 1 = I (one); 5 = V (five);

  • 10 = X (ten); 50 = L (fifty);

  • 100 = C (one hundred); 500 = D (five hundred);

  • 1,000 = M (one thousand);

  • (*) 5,000 = (V) (five thousand); (*) 10,000 = (X) (ten thousand) - for future dates writing;

Note 1: (*) Number was also written with a bar above or between two vertical bars. We prefer the writing of larger numerals between brackets () since 1) on one hand it is more accessible to computer users and 2) on the other it avoids the confusion between a vertical bar | and the Roman numeral I (I = one).

Note 2: (*) Romans did not use right from the beginning numbers larger than 3,999, so they initially had no representation for numbers like:

  • 5,000 = (V), 10,000 = (X), 50,000 = (L), 100,000 = (C), 500,000 = (D), or 1,000,000 = (M).

These larger numerals were later added and for them various different notations were used, not necessarily the ones above. Thus, initially, the maximum number that could be written using Roman numerals was:

  • MMMCMXCIX = 3,999.

Roman numerals basic reading rules


Roman numerals from 1 to 100


Roman numerals from 1 to 1000